History Through Our Eyes: March 28, 1938, river ice

The 1938 spring breakup in the Montreal region was a difficult one, with ice jams and widespread flooding.

March 28, 1938: Ice from the St. Lawrence piles up on the highway leading to Laprairie. Montreal Gazette Archives

The 1938 spring breakup in the Montreal region was a difficult one, with ice jams and widespread flooding.

This photograph, published on Monday, March 28, 1938, shows river ice “in a playful mood,” the caption writer observed, perhaps a little too cheerfully. In fact, the ice was piled up higher than the top of an automobile on the highway between Montreal and La Prairie.

A second photograph showed ice that had jammed against the Victoria Bridge two days earlier, although “bridge authorities reported that the bridge did not suffer any strain.”

Photographic evidence to the contrary, the situation was beginning to ease.

“Flood is on the wane in Montreal area,” the Montreal Gazette reported in a headline that day. It was an era of multiple headlines on every story. Here is what the other ones on the flood story said.

“Two Cartierville streets still under water but freshet receding”

“STE. THERESE NOW CLEAR”

“Chateauguay, St. Jerome and other points all report improvement – road conditions slightly better”

The article reported that the cellars of many homes in Cartierville were still filled with water but residents were able to access their houses via makeshift bridges made of planks. Dynamite was used to break up the jammed ice near Pont Viau and in Ste-Thérèse, reducing the problems.

By mid-week, the floods had disappeared from the pages of the Gazette, supplanted by news about the return of animals to the zoo at Lafontaine Park (March 31) and an anti-Fascist riot on Stanley St. (April 2).

March 28, 1938: Ice from the St. Lawrence on the highway leading to Laprairie.  Montreal Gazette archives. MONwp

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Источник: Montrealgazette.com

Источник: Corruptioner.life

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